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Posts Categorized / SQL Server IO

  • Oct 27 / 2008
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dbDigger, SQL Server IO, Storage

Average Seek Time for SQL Server I/O operations

Average seek time is the time that head of a disk takes on average to seek between random tracks on disk. It is important to consider that in an SQL Server environment due to simultaneous multiple I/O requests of different types the disk performs a lot of random I/O.

Rotational latency and seek time

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  • Oct 27 / 2008
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dbDigger, SQL Server IO, Storage

Track to Track Seek for SQL Server I/O operations

Track to track seek time is the time that head of a disk takes to move from one track to adjacent track. It is involved mostly in sequential operations on disk. If I/O operations are submitted to disk at a fast speed then track to track seek time is less and I/O becomes efficient but it is ideal case and does not occurs mostly and disk platter spins among this time. Track to track seek time of a disk has no dependence on fact that how you have mapped data files to disk. It depends entirely on design and performance of your disk controller.

Rotational latency and seek time in SQL Server databases

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  • Oct 27 / 2008
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dbDigger, SQL Server IO, Storage

Disk Seeks for SQL Server I/O operations

Keeping in view the architecture of a disk drive, we know that not only disk spins under the head but also head of disk has to move forward and backward to access required track on disk. So the time that disk head will take to access the track is called seek time and this process is called disk seeks. When data is read sequentially the seek time is minimal and if it is being read randomly then seek time may be more. Seek time affects I/O performance of your database system. So to keep the seek time minimal it is important to disperse your data files on multiple disks so that sequential read is performed to maximum extend.


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  • Oct 27 / 2008
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dbDigger, SQL Server IO, Storage

Rotational latency for SQL Server I/O operations

Disk sector to be read should be under the head of disk. To read a sector, head waits for sector to be under it. The time that a disk takes for data to be under head is called rotational latency. Rotational latency is added to response time for access of disk. As spin of disk is involved in this case, so spin speed of disk is most important. Spin speed of disk is measured in revolutions per minute (RPM). More the revolutions per minute (RPM) of a disk, less the rotational latency will be. So revolutions per minute (RPM) of a disk directly affect the I/O performance of your disk and thus database. Normally high performance disks operate at 10,000 RPM, but this speed is subject to improvement as time passes.

Relational and storage engine of SQL Server

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  • Oct 27 / 2008
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dbDigger, Monitoring and Analysis, SQL Server IO, Storage

Characteristics for I/O performance monitoring for SQL Server Databases

Several factors are involved in performance of disk drive having your data files. Along with typical characteristics of disk, OS , Drivers and network over head also contribute to performance. I have list the major factors here.

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